Tag Archives: orange county realtor

Do you qualify as “low income” in Orange County?

Source: OC Register

A family of four with an annual income of $84,450 or less now qualifies as low income in Orange County. A single person living alone qualifies as low income if he or she earns $58,450 or less a year.

Orange County has the fifth-highest income threshold in the nation, according to new income limits released last month by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Record-high rents and home prices are driving up Southern California income limits. Orange County apartment rents, for example, increased 20 percent over the past seven years, while the median sale price of an Orange County house has jumped 40 percent.

OC median home price tops $700k–a new record!

Home for sale in Dana Point. Click photo for details.

According to this article from the OC Register, property values throughout Orange County have risen to a record high for the third month in a row.

Highlights from the article:

  • The median price of a home hit $710,000 last month, up 10.9%
  • That’s up $25,000 from August’s median of $685,000, the sixth-biggest one-month price gain in records dating back to 1988
  • Home prices also rose in September throughout Southern California, pushing the regionwide median to its bubble-era high of $505,000 for the first time in a decade

Last month’s median almost elevates Orange County home values to Bay Area levels, where the nine-county median was $742,000 in August.

Will values keep going up? Only time will tell.

Are people fleeing southern California?

 

Home for sale in Dana Point. Click photo for details.

Source: OC Register

During the first 10 months of 2016, 5,706 residents of Orange, Los Angeles, Riverside and San Bernardino counties took out loans to buy a primary residence out of state, a CoreLogic analysis of mortgage applications shows.

Lower home prices and taxes, less congestion, family ties, or a more conservative environment are luring Southern Californians to leave the state, some transplants say. But housing costs clearly are the chief factor. Southern California’s housing market is one of the most expensive in the nation, with the median house price averaging $473,000 in 2016, double the U.S. average. And the costs are even higher in Orange and Los Angeles counties, which accounted for most of the region’s out-migration. The CoreLogic study showed one out of every four Los Angeles-Orange County homebuyers moved out of their county.

About 8.3 percent moved to the Inland Empire, while 8.2 percent left the state altogether. CoreLogic’s study is just the latest in a series of reports showing California among the nation’s leaders in out-migration, trailing only New York and Illinois in net out-migration numbers. About 266,000 more people left California than moved in from other states from 2010 to 2015, U.S. Census data show. Orange County lost nearly 11,000 residents to other California counties or other states. Los Angeles County lost almost 270,000 but Riverside County offset that loss with a net gain of 66,000 people.

To be fair, that doesn’t include people moving to California and the region from overseas, which more than offsets the loss to other states in California and Orange County. It also doesn’t take into account California’s largest-in-nation population. When taking population into account, net migration to other states accounted for 0.2 percent of all residents in 2015, 24th highest in the nation.

How much longer can southern CA home prices keep going up?

 

Home for sale in Dana Point. Click photo for details.

Source: OC Register

For 62 straight months, Southern California home prices have gone in one direction. Up. Five years ago, you could snatch up a median-priced condo in Orange and Los Angeles counties for about $280,000, 76 percent less than today’s prices. A median-priced house cost $323,000 in L.A. County five years ago and $495,000 in O.C., about $260,000 less than today’s prices in both counties.

What should a buyer do now? Will prices keep rising? Or are prices close to the top?

The OC Register asked a half-dozen economists and industry analysts what the future holds for home prices in the region. Among their answers:

  • Southern California home prices aren’t about to drop. In fact, they believe prices will keep rising for two more years, at least, and possibly longer.
  • The market isn’t in a bubble — yet — although bubble talk is starting to “raise its ugly head” at cocktail parties, one economist said. Some analysts are saying Southern California home prices are showing signs of being overvalued.
  • If you’re thinking about buying a home, now just might be the time to act — provided you don’t overextend yourself and you plan to live there awhile.

Here are five key questions about where Southern California home prices are heading in the future.

Q: Are we at the peak?

A: Not one of the economists interviewed thinks we are, at least not for entry-level homes. Luxury homes, priced at $2 million and up, may have reached a price peak and are facing an oversupply of listings, analysts said.

Nominal home prices have surpassed pre-recession highs in Orange and Los Angeles counties. Riverside and San Bernardino counties are about 18 percent below their price peaks. But none of those counties has reached pre-recession peaks in inflation-adjusted dollars.

If home prices were to keep rising at the current appreciation rate, and inflation were to continue at the current rate, Orange County’s median home price won’t get back to the pre-recession peak after inflation for about two to three years.

Another fact to consider: During the last market run up, Southern California home prices increased year over year for 126 consecutive months, or 10½ years. That’s twice as long as the current streak in home price gains.

Lastly, analysts say home prices aren’t rising that much. Price increases averaged 6.3 percent in Southern California in the past year, ranging from a low of 5.4 percent In Orange County to a high of 7.9 percent in San Bernardino County.

Q: How much longer will home prices go up?

A: Two years at least, most economists interviewed said. Possibly longer.

Projections by the California Association of Realtors show a gradual decrease in home price appreciation over the next few years, said Oscar Wei, a senior economist for the group. For example, CAR projects prices will go up 5 percent statewide in 2017, 4 percent in 2018, and 2.5 percent in 2019.

Assuming the Gross Domestic Product continues to grow at 2.5 percent and mortgage interest rates stay below 4.5 percent, Southern California home prices could be going up at 6 percent a year for the next six to seven years. At 6 percent a year, the median home price could reach almost $700,000 in Southern California by 2023, $500,000 in Riverside County, $800,000 in Los Angeles County and nearly $1 million in Orange County.

Q: Are we in a bubble now?

A: No.  Los Angeles and Orange counties had an 11½-month supply of homes for sale in the spring of 2007 compared with under four months available this year. Riverside County had an 8½-month supply of listings for sale, vs. just under four months today; San Bernardino County had a 16½-month supply, vs. four months today.

In California as a whole, 43 percent of borrowers had second mortgages in 2006, vs. 4.8 percent last year.  California’s median down payment was 11.8 percent of the purchase price in 2006, vs. 18.6 percent last year. To sum up, we don’t have as many people over-leveraging their homes.

Q: When is the next recession?

A: Not for at least two years, economists said. “Over the next two years, the recession probability is very low,” said UCLA economics professor William Yu, a member of the team producing the UCLA Anderson Forecast. “But beyond two years, that is very difficult to say.”

A major global calamity — like a new Korean War, a messy breakup of the European Union or a surge in oil prices — could trigger a recession, but forecasting exactly when is an extremely murky business, said Joachim Fels, a Pimco managing director and global economic adviser.

Q: Is it too late to buy a home?

A: Industry analysts have advised renters for the past four years to get into the housing market while interest rates and prices still are low. While it’s definitely more expensive to buy a home today than it was a few years back, the cost of buying will be even greater down the road.

If you wait, home prices probably will go up about 8 percent or so in the next couple of years. Plus you’re probably going to see some increase in mortgage rates. Analysts predict mortgage rates will go up half a percentage point this year and half a percentage point next year.

Source: OC Register

Spotlight On: Best Golf Courses in South Orange County

Monarch Beach Golf Links (Dana Point)
50 Monarch Beach Resort N, Dana Point, CA 92629
949-248-3002


Arroyo Trabuco Golf Club (Mission Viejo)
26772 Avery Pkwy, Mission Viejo, CA 92692
949-305-5100


San Juan Hills Golf Club (San Juan Capistrano)
32120 San Juan Creek Rd, San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675
949-493-1167


Ben Brown’s Golf Course at The Ranch Laguna Beach (Laguna Beach)
31106 Coast Hwy, Laguna Beach, CA 92651
949-499-2271

Shorecliffs Golf Course (San Clemente)
501 Avenida Vaquero, San Clemente, CA 92672
949-492-1177


San Clemente Municipal Golf Course (San Clemente)
150 E Avenida Magdalena, San Clemente, CA 92672
949-361-8384


Talega Golf Club (San Clemente)
990 Avenida Talega, San Clemente, CA 92673
949-369-6226


Bella Collina Golf Course (San Clemente)
200 Av. La Pata, San Clemente, CA 92673
949-498-6604

Finding a good home inspector

Is Your Home Inspector Legit? Why Buyers Should Inspect Their Inspectors

Of the roughly 30,000 U.S. home inspectors nationally, those in about 15 states don’t need to be licensed, according to the American Society of Home Inspectors. Among the non-licensure states—you guessed it includes California.

How to inspect the home inspectors—and find a winner

Good sources to finding a Home Inspector are professional trade associations. There are two quality associations available in California: the California Real Estate Inspection Association, CREIA and the American Society of Home Inspectors, ASHI. Both organizations require their members to pass an exam showing competence in the home inspection profession along with requiring that each member maintains continuing educational credits each year, CREIA requiring 30 hours per year and ASHI requiring 20 hours per year.

The client should interview all potential Inspectors they are considering and ask the following:

  • Is the inspector a member of CREIA and/or ASHI?
  • What does the inspection cover? Make sure the inspection and the inspection report meet all applicable requirements and comply with the CREIA and/or ASHI Standards of Practice. Both Standards of Practice are recognized by the California Legislature
  • How long has the inspector been practicing and how many inspections have they completed?
  • Does the inspector’s company offer to do repairs or improvements based on the inspection? This is against the CREIA and ASHI Code of Ethics as it is a defined conflict of interest
  • How long will the inspection take? The average for a single inspection is 2 to 3 hours for a typical single-family house; anything less may not be enough time to do a thorough inspection. Some inspection firms send a team of inspectors and the time frame may be shorter
  • Does the inspector prepare a written report? Ask to see samples and determine whether or not you can understand the inspector’s reporting style
  • Does the inspector encourage the client to attend the inspection? This is a valuable educational opportunity, and an inspector’s refusal to allow this should raise a red flag
  • Does the inspector participate in continuing education programs to keep his or her expertise up to date? One can never know it all, and the inspector’s commitment to continuing education is a good measure of his professionalism and service to the consumer

As for what to do if problems crop up that the inspector should have found, the first course of action should be to contact the inspector directly to discuss the issue. No corrective work should be undertaken before the inspector has an opportunity to review the report and be given the chance to revisit the property. Good inspectors will make good on their services if they missed something that should have been discovered during the course of the inspection. Keep in mind that the inspector is operating per an accepted Standards of Practice which states what is required to be inspected and what is not. Also many Inspectors carry professional liability, errors and omission insurance (although it is not required).

 

Beginner’s guide to loans

Home for sale in Dana Point. Click photo for details.

How much home can you afford? There are several loan programs available, and depending on your credit history, there is bound to be one that is perfect for you. Here are a few examples of the most popular programs offered today:

Fixed-Rate Loans

The fixed-rate mortgage is the most popular mortgage program in use today. Fixed-rate loans offer the borrow a fixed interest rate for the life of the loan, typically 15 to 30 years. Borrowers have peace of mind knowing that their monthly payment will not change over time. Conventional fixed-rate mortgages have underwriting requirements established by Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, and require certain down-payment and debt-to-equity ratios to qualify. Fixed-rate loans are especially attractive to buyers who plan to stay in their home for more than a few years.

Adjustable Rate Loans

With an Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM), the interest rate changes periodically, and payments go up or down accordingly. Rates are tied to an index that reflects the cost of money at any given point in time. Generally speaking, lenders charge a lower initial interest rate for the ARM than for the fixed rate mortgage. If you are expecting interest rates to decrease in the future, or if you are trying to maximize your purchase power today knowing your income will rise in the future, then this loan may be right for you. Adjustable rate loans are attractive for buyers who expect to be in the home for a short period of time.

FHA and VA Loans

The Federal Housing Administration (FHA), offers loans for low-to-moderate-income home buyers. FHA loans have lower down payments, and have relatively easier requirements than conventional fixed-rate mortgages. FHA mortgages have no income restrictions and even those with lower credit scores may be considered. Past bankruptcy does not necessarily disqualify borrowers from using this program.

In addition, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) offers a zero-down mortgage program. To take advantage of this program, borrowers need to be among those listed as veterans and service personnel in the U.S. military. One of the biggest benefits of this program is that it eliminates the need for private mortgage insurance.

>> Review common mortgage terms