How renters should prepare for home ownership

Source: OC Housing News

To prepare for home ownership, rent a property using 23% or less of your gross income. Save 8% of your gross income in a special down payment account you don’t raid for other lifestyle expenses or purchases. In less than two years, you will have the down payment to purchase a property comparable to your rental using FHA financing. With the discipline you gained from living within your means and saving for a down payment, you will succeed as a home owner and build equity through paying down a mortgage. You might even be rewarded by the appreciation fairies and complete a move-up once you have about 30% equity in your home and you can sell, cover the closing costs and still have 20% for a down payment on a nicer property.

PITI

PITI is short for principal, interest, taxes and insurance, but it also includes other known costs such as HOA dues and private mortgage insurance. When a lender calculates the maximum loan they will extend a borrower to buy a particular property, they start with the borrowers income and apply the maximum debt-to-income ratio, currently 31%. They take this number and divide it by 12 to come up with a maximum PITI. For example, let’s say a borrower making $100,000 per year wants to buy a home. The lender will allow them to put $31,000 per year ($100,000 x 0.31) or $2,583 per month to cover PITI.

Maximum loan balance

When lenders calculate your maximum allowable loan balance, they back out taxes (including Mello Roos), insurance, and HOA dues to calculate the remaining amount left over to cover the payment, which includes principal and interest. Generally, about 25% of PITI is consumed by taxes, insurance and other costs. Let’s assume $583 is consumed for these backed-out items. The remaining $2,000 is available to make a payment. From that, lenders use another formula that takes into account the interest rate to calculate the maximum loan balance.

If we stay with our example from above, a borrower making $100,000 per year making a $2,000 monthly payment can borrow $440,000 using 20% down conventional financing or $381,175 using FHA financing.

Rent and Savings

A renter making $100,000 a year should be paying about $1,900 in rent and saving about $700 per month toward a down payment. That translates to a 23% rent-to-income ratio.

From the above example, a $440,000 conventional loan balance leaves a $110,000 down payment to purchase a $550,000 house. At $700 per month, it will take 158 months to save the $142,052 for a down payment. Thirteen years is a very long time. That’s why so many people opt for FHA financing with 3.5% down. At $700 per month, it only takes 20 months, or just over a year and a half, to save the $13,825 required to cover the FHA down payment on a $395,000 property.

Did you notice the catch to using FHA financing? People who don’t have a 20% down payment have to settle for much less house on the same income. This is why the tradition of buying a starter home, waiting until it accrues 20% equity, then selling for a move-up is such a big part of our housing market.